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I'm Jena

How to Take a Sabbatical | Guest Contributor Jenn Smith | Jena Viviano | Career Strategist

Years ago, I took a much-needed sabbatical. And I learned how helpful it can be. But I think this season of social distancing and quarantine can feel like a forced sabbatical of sorts. And it is making many of us antsy. Any other Enneagram Type 3's out there!?

I don’t know about you, but this forced change of pace and time to pause has been hard for me. Back in my 15+ years spent in the corporate world, we would measure a pause by minutes, not by days… turning into weeks.

Today, with many of us shoved into this forced pause, maybe there’s an opportunity to reframe this newly found time as a “mandatory sabbatical” of some sort? Can we use this space as a wellness leave without all the anxiety related to asking for time away or navigating company policies that don’t exist?

Can we use this time to evaluate what we do AND do not want to rush back into when this pandemic pandemonium is behind us?

Join me in thinking about this time and space as a required sabbatical to pause, reflect, restore, rejuvenate and ultimately discover how to make each day count.

A Look Back To When I Needed a Pause

First, a brief look back.

At one point in my career, I wanted — no, I needed — a pause. I wasn’t feeling motivated or able to inspire others and decided I needed to step away from work. The only problem was that my company didn’t have a practice or policy for the kind of a break I wished for:

  • No sabbatical without being a professor or working in higher ed.
  • No leave of absence without a documented medical condition.
  • No maternity leave without having a baby.
  • No extra-extended mental health day without a written policy or benefit for such a thing.

Basically, I would be breaking every single HR rule possible... and coming from an HR girl, this was not an easy thing to do.

I felt like I was breaking the law. I felt like I was betraying my team. I felt incapable because I couldn’t hack it. I felt selfish – why should I be allowed to do this? I was afraid I’d be a burden. I didn’t want to ask for help.

Was my only recourse to quit? 

Turns out no. My manager listened to me, provided support and together, we came up with a plan to step away for an extended time… we called it a ‘wellness’ leave.

Within my coaching practice, many of my clients crave genuine time away (beyond the typical stingy 5 days of PTO), so I thought I’d capture a few of the key points that helped make my sabbatical — my wellness leave — happen even though there was no policy in place to support such a pause.

How to Take a Sabbatical | Guest Contributor Jenn Smith | Jena Viviano | Career Strategist

Steps to take a sabbatical – even without a policy in your workplace:

A mindset shift

The approach that helped me get out of my own way and muster up the nerve to do this was placing myself in my manager’s shoes. What would I do if one of my key players told me they needed a break? Hands down, I would do whatever I could. I would break all the rules and make it happen. This mindset shift was a game-changer.  


Research

What organizations are providing a sabbatical or wellness leave benefits for their employees? How are they doing it? Is it successful? Are sabbaticals solely for those working in higher ed? What organizations in my industry are doing it?

Did you know there are companies to help companies create sabbatical benefits for their employees? Yup, I was blown away by this! My research not only provided tactical info on how to approach this idea with my employer, but it also opened my eyes to realize how many others are likely feeling the same way I was feeling… another data point to endorse my mindset shift.


Craft A Plan

Who, what, where, when, how. Thinking through all the aspects of work that needed to continue while I was out and ensuring a smart, practical plan was set in place before my departure. Who will fill-in? What work is the most important and must continue? What can wait until I return? Where will I store my information to ensure a seamless transition and so everyone has access to what they need? When is the least disruptive time? How will I tell the team? 

Ultimately, spending the time to craft a thorough plan allowed for this sabbatical/wellness leave to happen... without even having a policy in place.

And the result of my wellness leave was noteworthy. This extended pause was undeniably one of the best things I could have done for my wellbeing… which inevitably extended to my family, my friends, and my colleagues upon my return to work. 


100 days away from corporate America

My wellness leave was exactly 100 days. I distinctly recall this realization … about halfway through my time away, I felt like my brain was unwinding itself and I was finally feeling somewhat restored. So, I checked the calendar, how long did it take to unwire my brain and feel rested? 6 weeks. And how much time did I have until I returned to work? 8 weeks. I literally counted each day... 100 days.   

How to Take a Sabbatical | Guest Contributor Jenn Smith | Jena Viviano | Career Strategist

What I learned from 100 days away from work:

It's Okay to Take a Break

Have you heard the term, “corporate athletes?”  The first time I heard this term, it piqued my interest. Check out this article from Harvard Business Review if it sparks curiosity. In a nutshell, “on the playing field or in the boardroom, high performance depends as much on how people renew and recover energy as on how they expend it, on how they manage their lives as much as on how they manage their work. When people feel strong and resilient—physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually—they perform better, with more passion, for longer. They win, their families win, and the corporations that employ them win.” 

Working in corporate America takes resilience and dedication, not unlike an all-star athlete. All-star athletes typically do not compete 365 days a year, corporate athletes, on the other hand, are often expected to. It’s ok to take a break.


My best & Most Creative Work

My best, most creative work happens while I’m walking in the woods, or traveling, or cooking a nutritious meal. NOT when I’m standing (or sitting) at my computer. Trading the daily work routine for doing what I wanted to do, when I wanted to do it, ignited ingenuity I didn’t even know existed. While walking in the park, new ideas came easily without effort. Energy poured into my day. So much so, at one point is had 137 new pages within my Notes app! I had so many thoughts to capture and couldn’t wait to act on! 


Mindfulness and Presence Matter

I learned so much about mindfulness and being present. What a difference Thanksgiving dinner was when I had 100% of my mind on Thanksgiving dinner. Remaining present and relishing the time with the people who mean the most was surprisingly more enjoyable. My mind was in the moment, not wondering or anticipating the next day or week at work. 

How to Take a Sabbatical | Guest Contributor Jenn Smith | Jena Viviano | Career Strategist

Recharging My Battery Opens up New Space

Recharging my battery. Prior to this sabbatical, meeting up with my friends or family, at times, seemed like a chore. Especially for an introvert – being “ON” all the time without a recovery period consumes a ton of energy. After a long day of work the energy needed to interact with a friend, often felt unbearable. Throughout the time away from work, I looked forward to meeting with my friends, I enjoyed the time even more… and I unexpectedly, frequently, initiated happy hours and hosted gatherings, which was nearly unheard of when immersed in my 9-5.


Re-evaluating My Relationship With Time

The greatest lesson from spending 100 days away from my day job was re-evaluating my relationship with time. Throughout my day job, I constantly told myself, “I just have to get through this day” or, “once this month is over, I’ll be able to relax.” Wishing the days away was perfectly acceptable to me — and I thought that was normal. During my sabbatical, the opposite occurred. I didn’t want the days to end, the time flew by in a flurry. I quickly realized this was because my time was my time, on my own terms. I recall an article written by Chip Gains titled, “Every day is Saturday.” Specifically, noting that Saturday doesn’t follow a schedule or require meeting after meeting along with endless expectations. It’s a beautifully spontaneous day. 

More than anything, I craved this space in my daily routine. My relationship with time shifted so much so, I now have this quote by the late, great Muhammad Ali plastered around my workspace, “Don’t count the days. Make the days count.”

And that's the opportunity for us all now, to discover for ourselves what's important and how to make each day count. 

Jenn Smith Guest Contributor | Jena Viviano | Career Strategist | Career Coach

Jenn Smith

Jenn gets what companies are looking for when hiring top talent, it’s what she does. As a former talent acquisition and HR leader whose experience spans more than 15 years across multiple industries – including Fortune 200 companies – she has recruited, coached, and hired hundreds of early-career professionals into positions ranging from human resources, finance, and engineering, to IT, sales, and operations. 

And now we are thrilled to have Jenn join us at team Viviano Media Co.! She is going to channel her incredible skills for the women within Recruit the Employer alongside Jena. We couldn’t be more excited about this opportunity to serve each of our clients more deeply with the addition of Jenn to the team! Jenn is a career crusader on a mission to support early and mid-career professionals navigate the new world of work by resetting boundaries and igniting action to live their happiest, healthiest lives. You can find out more about Jenn at Flourish Careers


Note from Jena: If you'd like to explore more about taking a sabbatical, listen to my episode One Way to Take a Sabbatical. And check out the wonderful thoughts my friend Kristi McLelland shared about How Sabbath Can Change Your Career.

And let me know if you have any thoughts on taking a sabbatical...have you taken one? Do you want to? Is coronavirus feeling like a sabbatical for you? 

Career

How to Take a Sabbatical, Whether Forced or By Choice

April 16, 2020

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recruit the employer

resources for your

Career

digital devotional

resume writing 101

freebie
my signature program

Word at work

digital devotional

Follow me on 

I'm here to make sure you become irresistible to recruiters and hiring managers. In an extremely competitive marketplace, I can show you how to take back control of the job search, become a stand-out candidate and ultimately land you your dream career. Oh, and I promise to make the process fun. Yes, fun.

I'm Jena