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A 3-Step Framework to Improve Your Communication at Work | Guest Contributor Louisa Liska | Jena Viviano | Your Career Strategist

Use This 3-Step Framework to Improve Your Communication at Work

Do you find yourself doing any of the following things on a regular basis? 

  • You make recommendations to leadership
  • You assign tasks to your team 
  • You build relationships with clients or vendors
  • You represent your company in the community 
  • You coordinate work on projects with other colleagues 


What do all of these scenarios have in common? 

They require strong communication skills. 

Because work is rarely done in isolation, I would argue that almost everyone can increase their effectiveness at work by improving their communication skills. Especially right now, when many of us are relying on new methods of communication to get work done, it’s essential to have a strong framework for communication that can be applied in a variety of settings.

This framework should include consideration of the following three steps:

A 3-Step Framework to Improve Your Communication at Work | Guest Contributor Louisa Liska | Jena Viviano | Your Career Strategist

Step 1: Who is your audience? 

Thinking about your audience should always be first when creating a communication plan. This is your chance to lean heavily on your emotional intelligence and empathy skills. 

As you are thinking about your audience, ask yourself the following questions: 

  • What are their current priorities? 
  • What are their hopes and goals related to what you have to communicate?
  • What might they find confusing or frustrating about what you have to communicate?
  • What might be exciting or especially interesting to them? 


Asking these questions helps you to better understand the people you are communicating with so you can customize your message specifically for them.  

 

Step 2: What is your main point? 

Often when we have something to communicate, we are experts on all of the nuance and details of what we want to share. Sometimes in the process of discovering or analyzing our message, we get lost in those details and lose the key message. 

The goal here is to boil down your key message into one main point. This doesn’t mean that you can’t communicate exposition or further details. But being clear for yourself on your main point will help you to strategize how to deliver the information and give your audience a focus point. 

A 3-Step Framework to Improve Your Communication at Work | Guest Contributor Louisa Liska | Jena Viviano | Your Career Strategist

Step 3: Build the Structure 

Now that you know your audience and your main point, your job is to build a structure that connects the two. I like to break this structure into four sections:
 

  1.     Exposition

This is where you build a connection between what your audience is currently thinking and your main point. The goal is to bridge this gap as clearly and concisely as possible. Often, we end up providing too many details here, including our process for analyzing or discovering our main point. In most cases, that level of detail is too much information for our audience and can lead to information overwhelm before we get to the main point. The key here is to edit like a pro!

  1.     The Main Point 

This is where you state your main point. Make sure to put it in a context that your audience will understand and highlight how it aligns with their priorities and goals.

  1.     Further Details 

Additional details should come after your main point and should be ordered based on your analysis of how important they are to your audience. That way if you are short on time, you have prioritized the most important parts to communicate. 

  1.     Feedback 

Communication isn’t just about sharing your point of view or message. It is essential to get some live feedback from your audience. This will help you to finetune your communication and better understand your audience. 

 

Use the Framework to Improve Your Communication

You can adapt this framework to all types of communication. The next time you have an important meeting or call, quickly run through these steps and adjust your messaging as needed. By customizing your message, you’ll get your point across more effectively, which ultimately helps you to work more effectively as well.

Guest Contributor | Louisa Liska | Jena Viviano | Career Coach

Louisa Liska

Louisa helps people who are passionate about their careers manage their productivity and mindset in order to avoid burnout. Visit her at theactually.com for her free foundational guide to creating an organization system to get things done while keeping a peaceful mind. Louisa is also a graduate of the Yale School of Drama and the General Manager of a major regional theater.

Career

Use This 3-Step Framework to Improve Your Communication at Work

April 30, 2020

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recruit the employer

resources for your

Career

digital devotional

resume writing 101

freebie
my signature program

Word at work

digital devotional

Follow me on 

I'm here to make sure you become irresistible to recruiters and hiring managers. In an extremely competitive marketplace, I can show you how to take back control of the job search, become a stand-out candidate and ultimately land you your dream career. Oh, and I promise to make the process fun. Yes, fun.

I'm Jena